I realized that this chair was going to need to be stripped because I was not going to be able to achieve a smooth finish without sanding and I wasn't going to be able to keep it from chipping any further either.  There were two layers of paint and a sealer to get through, which takes a few steps unless a very caustic stripper is used.  I prefer to use Citristrip if at all possible.  It does not have the fumes that other strippers have.   I applied the Citristrip as directed on the label and wrapped it in cling wrap to let it sit 

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This project happens to start with a custom chair that was purchased at a garage sale for $5 and brought to me for an update.  At first glance I thought this would be a simple project and it wasn't until I took a closer look that I figured out that the previously applied paint had many, many drips and would chip easily when I tried sanding the chair.  

for some time.  The reason for the cling wrap is to keep the Citristrip moist until the paint is ready to be removed.  If it is allowed to dry, the paint may not come off.  Once I removed all of the paint and sealer that I could with scrapers, I began to stand the chair, starting with 80 grit sand paper and going all of the way up to 400 grit for a smooth finish.  I also filled all of the holes on the seat, filled in where pieces were missing, glued a few joints and sanded down some of the nicks in the surface.  

​​​​​​​​​​THIS LIFE GOES ON IS A FURNITURE REHAB BUSINESS BASED IN SOUTH CENTRAL WISCONSIN SPECIALIZING IN ARTISTICALLY PAINTED FINISHES 

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Have you ever wondered what goes into the process of updating a vintage or antique piece of furniture?  I thought I would share with you the process that I went through with a small project that most might think looks rather simple to do.